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2 years 2 months ago - 8 months 1 week ago #1835 by Lombard Illinois
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2 years 2 months ago #1854 by Vintagepos
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I use for the base screws on 300 class use 1/8 " machine thread and the small cabinet screws are 6 guage 32 threads per inch machine thread . Milton
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2 years 2 months ago #1862 by Vintagepos
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John, I am sorry about the base screws, they are 6 guage 32 tpi as well. Other screw sizes from memory are 3/32" 64 tpi, 1/8" 48 tpi,, 5/32" 32 tpi and 3/16" 32tpi, I hope my memory holds out. Dick may be able to confirm. 2 of these may be doubtful is the 1/8" may be 40tpi and the 5/32" may be 36 tpi most suppliers have a guage to measure the treads per inch. but the most common on the 300 class is different as it is 6 guage wire that they made the screws out of not by imperial or metric sizes Milton
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2 years 2 months ago - 8 months 1 week ago #1869 by Lombard Illinois
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2 years 2 months ago #1871 by Vintagepos
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You mean the ones that NCR use to buy in before they tooled up to make their own? Sorry can't help maybe Bill or Dick may know
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2 years 2 months ago #1880 by Dick Witcher
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I have a pair of pliers that strip & crimp wires. It also has screw cutters. This is the greatest tool in the world. Most popular screws threads are on this pliers. Also when you have to cut a screw down it leaves a clean cut that goes right in. As I recall in the very early days of screws, there was a coarse thread & a fine thread that was the same size & number of threads. There is a drill templet that will give you the stock diamiter & another tool that you can get that has about 20 thread gages on it. A tap & die set is good to have. They do make one for jewelers with very small tap & dies. Most National screws are common enough that the modern screws fit. The only exception is the real small ones on the keyboard strips of the 400 & 500.
If you are screw shopping most Home Depots & Ace Hardware have a screw sizing strip in the screw section. Ace has stuff that I never thought I would find like brass colars, springs, knurled knobs, etc.
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2 years 2 months ago #1884 by Jeff Kreft
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I think I understand what Johns question is. The SAE standard wasn't developed until 1905. Still many of the sizes of these screws are still the same. They are made with the same pitch and number of threads per inch. But nothing was standardized back then. Almost everything was hand made befor 1900. The Whitworth thread which became the British Standard Whitworth has almost the same thread pitches as the SAE standard, but its core diameters are slightly larger. This would explained why the sae screws would fit, however they would be a loose fit and would have more looseness when used in a threaded hole that was tapped for a BSW. You would not be able to insert a BSW scew in a tapped hole that was created with SAE specs, it would never fit. Most of the screws on the cash register is small enough that it wouldn't make a difference, and being that the screws are bronze or brass, they would conform to the screw pitch angle very easily. I hope this was the answer you were looking for. Yes the screw sizes on the very early registers was probably base on a British standard 55 degree screw angled pitch thread.

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2 years 2 months ago #1889 by 57nomad
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If your in need of the perfect tap in one tool ,pick up a Klein tri tap from your electrical supply house. It has 6/32. 8/32. 10/24 up to 1/4 20 all in one. It works great. Get a pair of wire strippers while your there, they cut 6/32 and 8/32 screws . It makes it real easy

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